Post Tagged with: "USA"

Three species of mini thorn snails identified with CT scans

Three species of mini thorn snails identified with CT scans

Invertebrates, New Species June 3, 2017 at 10:07 am

Using computer tomography (CT) tiny, highly fragile snails measuring less than 2 mm are described.  In total, there are fourteen species of thorn snails known in North and Central America.  

A potentially new species of finch has co-evolved with Rocky Mountain lodgepole pine

A potentially new species of finch has co-evolved with Rocky Mountain lodgepole pine

Birds, Evolution, New Species November 10, 2016 at 12:22 pm

Genetic analysis shows that the South Hills crossbill coevolved with the Rocky Mountain lodgepole pine, a striking example of coevolution driving speciation within perhaps as little as 6000 years.  “This is maybe the best and only clear example of reciprocal adaptation between two species contributing directly to the process of speciation”.

Species of Gall Midge from Great Smoky Mountains National Park is first of its genus in New World

Species of Gall Midge from Great Smoky Mountains National Park is first of its genus in New World

Insects, New Species November 2, 2016 at 10:20 am

A new article by Michael Ferro and John Plakidas describes a new species of fly that was collected in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Neostenoptera appalachiensis is a gall midge, and it is the first record of the genus Neostenoptera in the New World.

Chicago area scientists name chanterelle in the city’s honor

Chicago area scientists name chanterelle in the city’s honor

Celebrity Taxa, Mushrooms & Fungi, New Species September 23, 2016 at 10:19 am

Chicago-area scientists have named a new species of mushroom in the city’s honor. And it might end up on your pizza.  The chanterelle was identified by researchers from the Field Museum and Chicago Botanic Garden with help from Northwestern University students.  The Chicago chanterelle is smaller than other chanterelle mushrooms and is practically odorless compared to the distinctive fruity smell emitted by other types. The Chicago chanterelle is smaller than other chanterelle mushrooms and is practically odorless compared to the distinctive fruity smell emitted by other types. (Courtesy of the Field Museum)

These bees make their homes in sandstone

These bees make their homes in sandstone

Insects, New Species September 14, 2016 at 8:27 am

The bee Anthophora pueblo was first discovered by retired USDA-ARS research entomologist Frank Parker almost 40 years ago, when he collected samples of their nests at two sites in Utah’s San Rafael Desert. His research was never published, nor was the species formally identified, until now.  Researchers have been investigating this unusual new species of bee that doesn’t build its nest in a hollow tree or dig a burrow in the soil like ordinary bees, but instead carves itself a long-lasting home in sandstone cliffs.

New Beetle Species Identified in Nebraska

New Beetle Species Identified in Nebraska

Insects, New Species June 16, 2016 at 1:30 pm

The beetle went unrecognized as being different from the already-classified species Trox hamatus until fall 2015 when Paulsen began examining specimens of the genus Trox that he had collected from dried coyote scat in Nebraska.

Extremophile Worms Found in Colorado Cave

Extremophile Worms Found in Colorado Cave

Invertebrates, New Species May 11, 2016 at 8:47 am

As a research associate with the Denver Museum of Nature & Science’s zoology department, Dave Steinmann estimates he finds around 10 new species per year in Colorado.  But it took more than 1,000 hours of multiple independent lab tests, study for these “blood-red worms” to become official this year.  The hydrogen sulfide gas that fills the cave required a rescue team to wait outside while Steinmann explored. His discovery is significant because these “extremophile” worms — which are red, thin as pencil-lead and an inch long — show how life might have developed in other inhospitable environments like Mars orRead More

Biologists identify six new unique species of the western rattlesnake

Biologists identify six new unique species of the western rattlesnake

New Species, Reptiles March 17, 2016 at 9:07 am

The research team, using head shapes and genetic analyses, recommend that six groups of subspecies of the western rattlesnake be elevated to full species status, with the following names: Crotalus viridis, prairie rattlesnake Crotalus oreganus, northern Pacific rattlesnake Crotalus cerberus, Arizona black rattlesnake Crotalus helleri, southern Pacific rattlesnake Crotalus concolor, midget faded rattlesnake Crotalus lutosus, great basin rattlesnake The great basin rattlesnake (Crotalus lutosus), one of six new unique species identified by University of Arkansas biologists and their colleagues  

14 New Species of Tarantula.  One dressed in black, found near Folsom Prison named for Johnny Cash.

14 New Species of Tarantula. One dressed in black, found near Folsom Prison named for Johnny Cash.

Arachnids, Celebrity Taxa, New Species February 8, 2016 at 3:11 pm

A challenging, years-long survey has uncovered 14 new species of tarantula, including one named after Johnny Cash. National Geographic. Photography by Dr. Chris A Hamilton.  

Four new algae species discovered in Hawaii’s deep waters

Four new algae species discovered in Hawaii’s deep waters

New Species, Plants February 2, 2016 at 12:00 am

Scientists have announced the discovery of four new species of deep-water algae in Hawaii’s Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument. The new species were collected between 200-400 feet, depths not typically known for marine algae.

A New Species of Anglerfish from the Northern Gulf of Mexico.

A New Species of Anglerfish from the Northern Gulf of Mexico.

Fish, New Species July 30, 2015 at 6:50 am

A new species of the deep-sea ceratioid anglerfish genus Lasiognathus Regan (family Oneirodidae) is described on the basis of three female specimens collected in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Not especially similar to any of the five previously described members of the genus, the new species is unique in having a cylindrical, internally pigmented, anterior escal appendage and a pair of elongate distal escal appendages. The new species is diagnosed and described, and a revised key to the species of the genus is provided. Photo Credit: Theodore Pietsch, Ph.D. University of Washington