Post Tagged with: "United States"

A new North American flying squirrel

A new North American flying squirrel

Mammals, New Species May 30, 2017 at 11:40 am

Humboldt’s flying squirrel is the third species of flying squirrel found in North America.  The discovery means that three—not two—species of the furred gliders live in North America, and it changes our understanding of how these squirrels evolved and spread across the american continent.  The newly described Humboldt’s flying  squirrel (Glaucomys oregonensis) is found in forested habitats along the Pacific coast of North America, from southern British Columbia to southern California.

A cryptic species of dusky salamander from the southern United States

A cryptic species of dusky salamander from the southern United States

Amphibians, New Species May 10, 2017 at 8:55 am

The southern dusky salamander from the eastern Gulf Coastal Plain, first described in 1989 of the United States is redescribed as two species, with the new species as Desmognathus valentinei.

Five new truffle species identified in New Hampshire

Five new truffle species identified in New Hampshire

Mushrooms & Fungi, New Species May 8, 2017 at 9:49 am

While other types of so-called deer truffles have been found across Europe and the western United States, the particular species doctoral student Ryan Stephens found in the White Mountain National Forest have never been formally identified and named.   All Elaphomyces species are putatively associated with eastern hemlock,, a tree species in regional decline.  Small mammals play a key role in dispersing these Elaphomyces species and that the Elaphomyces are an important part of the small mammals’ diet.  

Review of Eastern US Populations of the Speckled Chub Reveals Four New Species

Review of Eastern US Populations of the Speckled Chub Reveals Four New Species

Fish, New Species April 6, 2017 at 9:49 am

A revised classification of eastern Macrhybopsis populations (Speckled Chub), with formal descriptions of four new species from eastern Gulf coast drainages.

New species of worm-snail shoots a web like Spiderman

New species of worm-snail shoots a web like Spiderman

Invertebrates, New Species, Species Discovery April 5, 2017 at 11:22 am

Scientists have discovered a new species of a marine creature called a worm-snail (scientifically known as a vermetid) that shoots out a substance much like a web from our popular comic-book superhero.  It is believed to be foreign to the waters off the Florida Keys, where it was found on an artifical reef.shoots web like spider-man.

New mint species

New mint species

New Species, Plants February 16, 2017 at 9:00 am

Two new species of hedge-nettles have been described from Alabama.  Hedge-nettles are a large group of plants in the mint family.

New species of stonefly from Virginia

New species of stonefly from Virginia

Insects, New Species February 3, 2017 at 9:04 pm

A study by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services biologists of three endemic stonefly species in Virginia revealed two new species.

Creepy crypt-keeper wasp

Creepy crypt-keeper wasp

Insects, New Species January 25, 2017 at 11:23 am

The wasp deposits an egg in the developing gall wasp.  The young eventually chews its way to freedom – through its host’s head.

Nine new ‘ant-like’ bee species found in Utah

Nine new ‘ant-like’ bee species found in Utah

Insects, New Species December 28, 2016 at 8:46 pm

A team of Utah State University researchers has found nine new species of bees that are found only in the Western United States, including Utah.

A new American crayfish

A new American crayfish

Crustaceans, New Species August 13, 2016 at 12:38 pm

Fallicambarus schusteri is the newest described crayfish from the Americas. The new burrowing species was discovered, surprisingly, along seasonally-flooded roadside ditches.

Large New Species of Harvestman from Oregon Only the Second in Its Genus

Large New Species of Harvestman from Oregon Only the Second in Its Genus

Arachnids, New Species January 26, 2016 at 12:00 am

Harvestmen are arachnids that are often mistaken for spiders. However, they are not even in the same order – spiders belong to Araneae, while harvestmen belong to Opiliones. In the U.S., harvestmen are often called ”daddy-longlegs” and are sometimes mistaken for cellar spiders in the family Pholcidae. A newly discovered species, however, does not resemble the thin-legged harvestmen that most people see. Known as Cryptomaster behemoth, it belongs to the suborder Laniatores, members of which are characterized by having relatively short legs.