Post Tagged with: "Natural History Collections"

A new rabbit from South America, with more to come

A new rabbit from South America, with more to come

Mammals, New Species June 24, 2017 at 8:21 am

A Portland State University researcher discovered that a rabbit known for centuries to exist in South America is different enough from its cousins to be its own unique species.  The creature will be only the third rabbit species named in South America.  Prof. Luis Ruedas made the discovery after studying rabbit specimens at the Naturalis Biodiversity Center in Leiden, the Netherlands, which were collected in the 1980s by Dutch scientists during the fieldwork in Suriname. The discovery follows another finding that Ruedas published this year showing that the South American cottontail, which was considered to be a single species distributed overRead More

Two species of Tarsiers named after first being collected 1908 and 1939

Two species of Tarsiers named after first being collected 1908 and 1939

Mammals, New Species May 8, 2017 at 8:31 am

Two new tarsier species are described from the northern peninsula of Sulawesi.  Distinct vocalizations helped classify these tarsiers as distinct species.  With these two new species, the total number of primates in Indonesia rises to 80 and the number of recognized tarsier species from Sulawesi and nearby islands rises to 11. The Gursky’s spectral tarsier (Tarsius spectrumgurskyae) from Tangkoko Nature Reserve, Sulawesi, Indonesia. Photo: Alfrets Masala / Shekelle et al / Primate Conservation.

A new genus of clingfish found in a 40+ year old specimen jar

A new genus of clingfish found in a 40+ year old specimen jar

Fish, New Species, Species Discovery April 24, 2017 at 11:48 am

Scientists at the University of Washington, Texas A&M University and the Western Australian Museum discovered the new genus and species of clingfish after stumbling upon a specimen preserved in a jar dating back to the 1970s, of the Western Australian Museum in Welshpool, Australia. The teensy translucent fish is just a few inches long, but it sports between 1,800 and 2,300 teeth in its duckbill-like mouth. The new species was trawled from sponge and algae reefs between 30–40 meters in depth offshore from Fremantle, Western Australia.  

Forgotten museum specimen and field study of birdsong leads to discovery of new bird species

Forgotten museum specimen and field study of birdsong leads to discovery of new bird species

Birds, New Species January 25, 2017 at 12:19 pm

A museum specimens forgotten for 120 years in a cabinet at the Trivandrum Natural History Museum lead to the field discovery of a new species of bird, in the coastal mountain chain of islands in the southwest of India.  Two new genera are described from revised species analysis, Western Ghats shortwings as Sholicola and the laughing thrushes as Montecincla.