Post Tagged with: "mesophotic"

First record of an invasive species preying on an undiscovered native species

First record of an invasive species preying on an undiscovered native species

Fish, New Species June 28, 2017 at 3:41 pm

Researchers have identified a new deep water goby in the Caribbean.  At the time of its discovery, from a submarine, researchers recorded footage of a lionfish cornering, attacking and eating the new species. The new species described in the paper has a bright orange stripe down its spine and schools together in masses of about 100 fish—starkly different behavior from most gobies that hide as individuals in holes or cracks in the reef, making the new species an easy target for lionfish attacks.  The good news is the goby species being eaten by the lionfish appears to be abundant throughoutRead More

A new genus of slopefish, discovered in a fish market, and photographed during a coelocanth survey.

A new genus of slopefish, discovered in a fish market, and photographed during a coelocanth survey.

Fish, New Species June 16, 2017 at 4:20 pm

An entirely new genus is described from the mesophotic reefs of Indonesia, just the second genus to join the slopefish family.  Cymatognathus aureolateralis, the Wavy Jaw Slopefish, was discovered by chance at a local fish market in Northern Sulawesi, where it had been collected as bycatch. Our only glimpse at this fish in life comes courtesy of a single, tantalizing image captured at a depth of 200 meters as part of a coelacanth survey.  

Two New Jawfishes and a New Genus Described From Deepwater Caribbean Reefs

Two New Jawfishes and a New Genus Described From Deepwater Caribbean Reefs

Fish, New Species, Species Discovery April 10, 2017 at 12:00 pm

Both new species were found in mesophotic reefs in the Caribbean.  Two specimens of the Pygmy Jawfish, a new species and genus,  were found 250m deep off Cuzumel.  It is only inch in length.  It is described as a new genus.   Despite occurring beyond the reach of most divers and collectors, the Curaçao Jawfish was already been made available to aquarists, collected by the Curaçao-based submersible Curasub.    

Dive into the twilight zone off Easter Island reveals new species

Dive into the twilight zone off Easter Island reveals new species

Fish, Invertebrates, New Species, Species Discovery April 6, 2017 at 10:48 am

A diving expedition off Easter Island, 60–150 meters beneath the surface (the “twilight zone”), reveal new species of fish and invertebrates.  In collaboration with SUBELAB Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, a scientific team from the California Academy of Sciences became the first divers to study mesophotic ecosystems off Rapa Nui.  An orange colored sea biscuit, and four fish collected are almost certainly new species.  California Academy of Sciences Ichthyology Curator Luis Rocha plans to give the fish all Rapa Nui names in honor of the local culture. Sea biscuit from Rapa Nui, 80-meters depth. Photograph: Rich Mooi/California Academy of Sciences  Read More

New Grammatonotus Species from Pohnpei, Micronesia

New Grammatonotus Species from Pohnpei, Micronesia

Fish, New Species March 15, 2017 at 2:36 pm

The two species were collected and described by authors from the Bishop Museum, found in deep reefs off Pohnpei Island and Senyavin Islands, the Caroline Islands group, western Pacific Ocean.  See also Brianne’s Groppo (Oct 2016). Grammatonotus xanthostigma. Photograph by Brian D. Greene. Grammatonotus pelipel. Photo by Brian D. Greene

Newly Discovered Species Named for President Obama (updated 12-26-16)

Newly Discovered Species Named for President Obama (updated 12-26-16)

Celebrity Taxa, Fish, New Species December 26, 2016 at 5:03 pm

The species was discovered 300 feet deep, on June 5, 2016, during a research trip to Kure, the world’s northernmost atoll.  The species name and description was published Dec 2016. “It is the one fish known to live only within the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, a pristine expanse of coral reefs and seamounts home to millions of seabirds, endangered turtles, endangered monk seals, and more than 7,000 species. So scientists thought it only fitting to name this fish after President Barack Obama, who dramatically expanded Papahānaumokuākea, creating the largest swath of protected land or water on Earth, an area roughly twice the size ofRead More

Nine new goby species and four new genera

Nine new goby species and four new genera

Fish, New Species June 16, 2016 at 9:08 am

Thanks to advances in submersible technology, recent exploration of mesophotic (AKA twilight zone) Caribbean reefs have yielded nine new deep-water goby species and a reclassification of the Nes subgroup of gobies.   All the gobies hail from deepwater, mesophotic Caribbean reefs.  The research team documented and captured specimens using manned submersibles such as the Johnson Sea-Link I and II submersibles and the Curasub.  

Godzilla Goby, from Southern Caribbean Waters

Godzilla Goby, from Southern Caribbean Waters

Fish, New Species June 16, 2016 at 8:54 am

The new species has a disproportionately large head and multiple rows of recurved canine teeth in each jaw, which is why the research team chose the common Godzilla goby. This deep water Goby adds to another identified last year and nine new goby species identified last month.  As part of The Smithsonian Deep Reef Observation Project (DROP), the new goby fish species was discovered in the southern Caribbean. Living at depths greater than conventional SCUBA divers can access, yet too shallow to be of interest for deep-diving submersibles, the fish will now be known under the common name of the Godzilla goby.

A New Gobi, Named in Honor of Reefs Conservationist

A New Gobi, Named in Honor of Reefs Conservationist

Fish, New Species April 21, 2016 at 8:41 pm

New species and genus to be fully described in Tornabene et al., in press.

Capturing a new species with a submersible.

Capturing a new species with a submersible.

Fish, Species Discovery March 22, 2016 at 9:06 am

The Smithsonian Deep Reef Observation Project (DROP) captured a new species of deep-reef fish using the Curasub submersible.  Coryphopterus curasub was collected between 70 and 80 m, the deepest depth range known for the genus.  The lead scientist on the sub was Carole Baldwin of the National Museum of Natural History and the pilot was Bruce Brandt. Video