Post Tagged with: "California"

A new North American flying squirrel

A new North American flying squirrel

Mammals, New Species May 30, 2017 at 11:40 am

Humboldt’s flying squirrel is the third species of flying squirrel found in North America.  The discovery means that three—not two—species of the furred gliders live in North America, and it changes our understanding of how these squirrels evolved and spread across the american continent.  The newly described Humboldt’s flying  squirrel (Glaucomys oregonensis) is found in forested habitats along the Pacific coast of North America, from southern British Columbia to southern California.

DNA and photo analyses reveal colorful new species of nudibranch from California

DNA and photo analyses reveal colorful new species of nudibranch from California

Invertebrates, New Species March 22, 2017 at 3:06 pm

Researchers studying a colorful group of sea slugs (also called nudibranchs) found along the California coast have named a new species in honor of Gary McDonald, a long-time staff member at UCSC’s Long Marine Laboratory.   The striking orange-red new species is about an inch long, found along the coast from Baja California to Sonoma County.   Based on the examination of over 600 images of specimens of Limacia available on Flickr and iNaturalist it appears that L. mcdonaldi sp. nov. has been common in the Monterey and San Francisco bay areas from 2014 through 2016.

A tiny moth with a blonde comb over, named for President Donald J Trump

A tiny moth with a blonde comb over, named for President Donald J Trump

Celebrity Taxa, Insects, New Species January 20, 2017 at 7:40 pm

Vazrick Nazari, an entomologist with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, discovered a species of twirler moth with bright yellow scales that sit like a cap atop the insect’s tiny head.   Dr. Nazari has dubbed the species Neopalpa donaldtrumpi.  The reason for this choice of name is to bring wider public attention to the need to continue protecting fragile habitats in the US that still contain many undescribed species.

Extremely leggy, male millipede discovered in a cave in California

Extremely leggy, male millipede discovered in a cave in California

Myriapods, New Species October 24, 2016 at 10:42 am

Just in time for Halloween, researchers have uncovered a new species of millipede that boasts an impressive array of features guaranteed to make you squirm.  Illacme tobini, a newly described species of millipede discovered in a dark cave at California’s Sequoia National Park, features 200 poison glands, silk-secreting hairs, and four penises.  Illacme tobini sp. n. is a short-range endemic restricted to the base of Yucca Mountain between the North and Marble forks of the Kaweah River in Sequoia National Park, California. The species is only known to occur in one small cave. Illacme tobini, an extremely leggy millipede from aRead More

DNA Analysis identifies two species of tiny endangered fish, one found only at Camp Pendleton

DNA Analysis identifies two species of tiny endangered fish, one found only at Camp Pendleton

Fish, New Species August 25, 2016 at 11:32 am

Scientists say a tiny endangered fish found in lagoons and streams along the California coast belongs to two separate species.  The tidewater goby, a 2-inch translucent fish, survives in relatively isolated populations from Del Norte County down to San Diego. The fish spend most of their lives in the same puddles, rarely traveling far from where they spawned.  E kristinae is in imminent danger of extinction and will require ongoing active management.    

A new scorpion genus from Northern California

A new scorpion genus from Northern California

Arachnids, New Species August 17, 2016 at 6:15 pm

The genus is composed of three species formerly placed in Pseudouroctonus: Graemeloweus iviei , G. glimmei and G. maidu.  Evidence is presented suggesting that Graemeloweus is more closely related to Kovarikia than Pseudouroctonus. Graemeloweus iviei.  

14 New Species of Tarantula.  One dressed in black, found near Folsom Prison named for Johnny Cash.

14 New Species of Tarantula. One dressed in black, found near Folsom Prison named for Johnny Cash.

Arachnids, Celebrity Taxa, New Species February 8, 2016 at 3:11 pm

A challenging, years-long survey has uncovered 14 new species of tarantula, including one named after Johnny Cash. National Geographic. Photography by Dr. Chris A Hamilton.  

Not a missing sock afterall, but a new worm species, with clues to early life.

Not a missing sock afterall, but a new worm species, with clues to early life.

Invertebrates, New Species February 4, 2016 at 11:58 am

A new species of deep-sea creature that resembles a discarded purple sock has been identified as an early form of life in a discovery that will help scientists understand how animals have evolved over time.

Academy of Sciences researchers discover 102 new specie…

Academy of Sciences researchers discover 102 new specie…

New Species, Species Discovery December 31, 2015 at 12:00 am

Main Report: SF Gate | Category: | Taxa: | Named for: Other reports:

Academy of Sciences researchers discover 102 new species in 2015

New Species, Species Discovery December 16, 2015 at 12:00 am

Main Report: California Academy of Sciences | Category: | Taxa: | Named for: Other reports: In 2015, rese102-new-species-described-by-the-california-academy-of-sciences-in-2015-0archers at the California Academy of Sciences added 102 new plant and animal species to our family tree, enriching our understanding of Earth

California Academy of Sciences discovers 100 new specie…

California Academy of Sciences discovers 100 new specie…

New Species, Species Discovery June 6, 2015 at 12:00 am

Main Report: EurekeAlert! | Category: | Taxa: | Named for: Other reports:

Citizen Scientists Find New Reptile Species in Southern California

Citizen Scientists Find New Reptile Species in Southern California

Citizen Science, News in Nature March 10, 2015 at 4:05 pm

These are examples of a sort of scientific collaboration that have become increasingly common. Scientists work with each other all the time, but more and more they find themselves turning to the public for help. An Indo-Pacific gecko in Glen Yoshida’s Torrance yard | Photo: © Jason Goldman