Post Tagged with: "Butterflies Moths & Skippers"

A new species of Tropical Burnet Moth from Texas

A new species of Tropical Burnet Moth from Texas

Insects, New Species December 5, 2017 at 9:22 am

Tropical Burnet Moths, Lacturidae are small-to-medium sized Moths with wingspans of 11-65 mm, and tend to be cream in colour with orange, red and yellow patterns.  Seventeen species are known from North and Central America, though all of these are rather similar in general appearance.  Larvae of the new species are greenish with red stripes and yellow spots, and are found on the leaves of the Gum Bully bush, Sideroxylon lanuginosum, with flying adults observed in April and May and larvae taking a year to mature.  

A wasp-mimicking moth

A wasp-mimicking moth

Insects, New Species November 29, 2017 at 10:45 am

A wasp-mimicking clearwing moth from the Malaysia peninsula has been filmed and described for the first time.

A 130-Year-Old Specimen Brought Back to Life

A 130-Year-Old Specimen Brought Back to Life

Insects, Lazarus Species November 29, 2017 at 10:29 am

A moth has been observed and filmed for the first time in its natural habitat, 130 years since only specimen was collected.  A clearwing moth known only from a single specimen from 1887 (which is is missing important morphological features), was observed and filmed for the first time in its natural habitat.   The moth’s known ecosystem is vanishing rapidly due to extensive human activity.  The authors recently filmed and described a new wasp-mimicking clearwing moth from the same area.

Blue butterfly has same number of chromosomes as you do

Blue butterfly has same number of chromosomes as you do

Insects, New Species November 28, 2017 at 11:39 am

What looked like a population of a common butterfly species turned out to be a whole new organism, and, moreover – one with a very peculiar genome organisation.  It was found flying over the northern slopes of the Caucasus mountains in southern Russia.

DNA barcode analysis reveals a new species of butterfly, the first in Israel in 109 years.

DNA barcode analysis reveals a new species of butterfly, the first in Israel in 109 years.

Insects, New Species, Species Discovery May 8, 2017 at 9:20 am

This new species is named Acentria’s fritillary (Melitaea acentria) and was found flying right over the slopes of the popular Mount Hermon ski resort in northern Israel.  The species may be one of a handful of butterflies known to have arisen through hybridisation between two other species.

A new skipper from south China

A new skipper from south China

Insects, New Species January 31, 2017 at 10:52 am

The new species resembles, and is named for O. maga which is widely distributed in S. China and Taiwan.

The Hermit Crab Caterpillar

The Hermit Crab Caterpillar

Citizen Science, Insects, New Species, Species Discovery January 25, 2017 at 12:45 pm

A caterpillar that was recently discovered in Peru exhibits a behavior previously unknown in caterpillars.  The critter was spotted by Dr. Joe Hanson, the creator and host of the YouTube channel “It’s OK to be Smart.” Hanson, along with entomologist Aaron Pomerantz and guide Pedro Lima, were filming in the Peruvian Amazon when they came across the creature. The caterpillar turned into a Cicinnus moth. Is this also a caterpillar carrying its own house?

Beautiful new moths from China

Beautiful new moths from China

Insects, New Species January 24, 2017 at 3:54 pm

A group of beautiful snout moths from China was revised by three scientists from the Institute of Zoology at the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

A tiny moth with a blonde comb over, named for President Donald J Trump

A tiny moth with a blonde comb over, named for President Donald J Trump

Celebrity Taxa, Insects, New Species January 20, 2017 at 7:40 pm

Vazrick Nazari, an entomologist with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, discovered a species of twirler moth with bright yellow scales that sit like a cap atop the insect’s tiny head.   Dr. Nazari has dubbed the species Neopalpa donaldtrumpi.  The reason for this choice of name is to bring wider public attention to the need to continue protecting fragile habitats in the US that still contain many undescribed species.