Mammals

New species of silky anteaters

New species of silky anteaters

Mammals, New Species December 11, 2017 at 11:22 am

Silky anteaters were once thought to comprise a single species, but researchers have now determined that the population is made up of seven unique species.  Researchers went on 10 expeditions in Brazil and Suriname in search of silky anteaters over a decade, and scoured natural history museums, collecting DNA samples from 33 wild anteaters and anatomical information collected from 280 museum specimens.  Three new species are named.

A new species of great ape has been discovered

A new species of great ape has been discovered

Mammals, New Species November 2, 2017 at 9:37 am

A new species of great ape has been discovered, represented by a small population of orangutans in northern Sumatra.  Now the most endangered great ape in the world, there are only an estimated 800 individuals of the new, third and most ancestral species of Orangutan.

Giant, tree-dwelling rat discovered in Solomon Islands

Giant, tree-dwelling rat discovered in Solomon Islands

Mammals, New Species, Species Discovery September 28, 2017 at 2:39 pm

The Vangunu giant rat can weigh two pounds and reach lengths of 1.5 feet.  Mammalogist Tyrone Lavery first heard stories about ‘vika’, a giant, coconut-cracking, tree-dwelling rat from the Solomon Islands, in 2010.  But the elusive rodent may already be close to extinction.  After years of searching for the elusive animal, he has finally confirmed its existence, making it the first new rodent species to be described from the islands in more than 80 years.  The animal that Lavery studied was found leaving a tree that had been felled by a commercial logging company. It died from its injuries, but wasRead More

‘Yoda bat’ officially recognised as new species

‘Yoda bat’ officially recognised as new species

Mammals, New Species August 27, 2017 at 10:32 am

An unusual breed of fruit bat—previously nicknamed ‘Yoda’ due to its resemblance to the Star Wars Jedi Master—has now officially been registered as a new species and renamed the happy (Hamamas) tube-nosed fruit bat.  The widespread New Guinean species which is tentatively placed in the cyclotis group.  

A new rabbit from South America, with more to come

A new rabbit from South America, with more to come

Mammals, New Species June 24, 2017 at 8:21 am

A Portland State University researcher discovered that a rabbit known for centuries to exist in South America is different enough from its cousins to be its own unique species.  The creature will be only the third rabbit species named in South America.  Prof. Luis Ruedas made the discovery after studying rabbit specimens at the Naturalis Biodiversity Center in Leiden, the Netherlands, which were collected in the 1980s by Dutch scientists during the fieldwork in Suriname. The discovery follows another finding that Ruedas published this year showing that the South American cottontail, which was considered to be a single species distributed overRead More

A new North American flying squirrel

A new North American flying squirrel

Mammals, New Species May 30, 2017 at 11:40 am

Humboldt’s flying squirrel is the third species of flying squirrel found in North America.  The discovery means that three—not two—species of the furred gliders live in North America, and it changes our understanding of how these squirrels evolved and spread across the american continent.  The newly described Humboldt’s flying  squirrel (Glaucomys oregonensis) is found in forested habitats along the Pacific coast of North America, from southern British Columbia to southern California.

Two new mole rats, one named Dr David Livingstone, I presume?

Two new mole rats, one named Dr David Livingstone, I presume?

Celebrity Taxa, Mammals, New Species May 8, 2017 at 3:08 pm

Two new species of African mole-rat have been discovered by researchers at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL), together with colleagues in Tanzania and at the University of Pretoria. The new mole-rats were found around Mount Hanang and at Ujiji on the shores of Lake Tanganyika, both in Tanzania. Fukomys livingstoni is named after Dr. David Livingstone, as Ujiji (the type locality) is the site of the famous meeting on 10 November 1871 when Henry Morton Stanley found the explorer David Livingstone, who many thought to be dead, and uttered the famous words “Dr. Livingstone, I presume?”

Two species of Tarsiers named after first being collected 1908 and 1939

Two species of Tarsiers named after first being collected 1908 and 1939

Mammals, New Species May 8, 2017 at 8:31 am

Two new tarsier species are described from the northern peninsula of Sulawesi.  Distinct vocalizations helped classify these tarsiers as distinct species.  With these two new species, the total number of primates in Indonesia rises to 80 and the number of recognized tarsier species from Sulawesi and nearby islands rises to 11. The Gursky’s spectral tarsier (Tarsius spectrumgurskyae) from Tangkoko Nature Reserve, Sulawesi, Indonesia. Photo: Alfrets Masala / Shekelle et al / Primate Conservation.

New Species of Dwarf Galago Discovered in Angola

New Species of Dwarf Galago Discovered in Angola

Mammals, New Species April 10, 2017 at 11:04 pm

The size of a squirrel (around six inches long without the tail), the Angolan dwarf galago is a kind of bushbaby, a small primate family scattered all over sub-Saharan Africa. However, most bushbabies are even smaller, making this one a giant among its tiny family. Researchrese detected the sounds of a previously undescribed species of dwarf bush baby in the Angola jungle.  The team noticed one of the calls didn’t sound anything like the 18 known species of bush baby—a tiny, bug-eyed mammal also called a galago—living in western Angola’s Kumbira Forest.  When the scientists finally spotted the primate, theyRead More

New Guinea highland wild dog rediscovered in the wild

New Guinea highland wild dog rediscovered in the wild

Lazarus Species, Mammals, New Species April 9, 2017 at 8:21 am

Unseen for more than 50 years, the New Guinea highland wild dog has at last been confirmed in its natural island habitat. Scientists are crooning over new pictures that confirm the survival of the New Guinea highland wild dog, which until now was feared to be extinct in its natural habitat on the South Pacific island Thought to be among the rarest species of canine, the highland wild dogs are either the same as or close relatives of the famous singing dogs of New Guinea, which exist only in captivity. More than a hundred camera-trap pictures taken in 2016 showRead More

A tiny new lemur species with big, soulful eyes

A tiny new lemur species with big, soulful eyes

Mammals, New Species January 19, 2017 at 12:57 am

The Ankarana or Sheth’s dwarf lemur (Cheirogaleus shethi) weighs a little over 100 grams, has a body length of just 12 centimeters (plus a tail of about 16 centimeters), and has tiny hands that probably wouldn’t even wrap about a human finger.

A New Primate Species, a Gibbon from South West China

A New Primate Species, a Gibbon from South West China

Mammals, New Species January 19, 2017 at 12:48 am

A gibbon living in the tropical forests of south west China is a new species of primate, scientists have concluded.  The animal has been studied for some time, but new research confirms it is different from all other gibbons.

A new pika species identified in the Himalaya

A new pika species identified in the Himalaya

Mammals, New Species September 24, 2016 at 9:21 am

A new study based on genetic data and skull measurements has identified a new species of pika high up in the Sikkim Himalaya.  The species is morphologically similar to Moupinpika, it is actually very distinct from the former from a genetic and ecological perspective.  

Turns out there are four species of Giraffe

Turns out there are four species of Giraffe

Mammals, New Species September 9, 2016 at 1:45 pm

A new genetic analysis of giraffes has revealed that the genus Giraffa actually contains at least four distinct species, not just three subspecies of the one species of giraffe.  The analysis reveals that giraffes should actually be divided into four distinct lineages that don’t interbreed in the wild.  Until recently, giraffe subspecies have been more simply assigned according to coat patterns, and local populations.

New species of Long-Nosed Bandicoot, identified from museum collections.

New species of Long-Nosed Bandicoot, identified from museum collections.

Mammals, New Species August 20, 2016 at 1:35 pm

Studying the teeth, skulls and skins of almost 100 bandicoots held in museum collections around Australia and in London has led a scientist from the Western Australian Museum to determine that animals previously thought to belong to the same species of Long-nosed Bandicoots are actually two distinctly different species. “Very little is known about the current population of this new elevated species because it hasn’t been widely studied, so we don’t know if it is healthy or not or whether it needs conservation or not,” lead author Dr Travouillon said.  “But this is an excellent example of the importance ofRead More

New Species of Rat, an ‘Island Giant’ from the Melanesian Archipelago

New Species of Rat, an ‘Island Giant’ from the Melanesian Archipelago

Mammals, New Species April 19, 2016 at 10:53 am

Over millennia of isolation on Manus, detentus has adapted to conditions. It has powerful front incisors but small molars, suggesting it uses its front teeth to break open hard nuts. It is an “island giant”, larger than almost any rat across the Melanesian archipelago. A typical detentus weighs nearly half a kilogram, with short, very coarse fur and a short tail.

A New Genus and Species of Rat, from Sulawesi.

A New Genus and Species of Rat, from Sulawesi.

Mammals, New Species April 19, 2016 at 9:47 am

An international research team discovered the rat, a new genus and species, on the remote and relatively inaccessible slopes of Mount Gandang Dewata, a mountainous region of Indonesia’s Sulawesi Island, a renowned hotspot for biodiversity. The scientists were surprised to discover that the slender rat is omnivorous, not carnivorous, like its island cousin. Also, “one has evolved for swimming and one for life on land, yet in evolutionary terms they are sisters.” Gracilimus radix, or the slender rat, discovered on Indonesia’s Sulawesi Island. Photo: Museum Victoria

New Genetic Methods Help Identify Three New Mouse Lemur Species

New Genetic Methods Help Identify Three New Mouse Lemur Species

Mammals, New Species April 15, 2016 at 3:58 pm

Scientists from the German Primate Center (DPZ), the University of Kentucky, the American Duke Lemur Center and the Université d’Antananarivo in Madagascar have described three new species of mouse lemurs. They live in the South and East of Madagascar and increase the number of known mouse lemur species to 24. As little as 20 years ago, only two species of these small, nocturnal primates were known. New genetic methods and expeditions to remote areas have made the new descriptions possible (Molecular Ecology).

New rat species find sheds light on Philippine mammalian diversity

New rat species find sheds light on Philippine mammalian diversity

Mammals, New Species November 11, 2015 at 12:00 am

The discovery of Batomys uragon (Mt. Isarog Hairy-tailed Rat) is a necessary building block to understanding the origin and evolution of perhaps the greatest concentration of unique mammalian diversity in the world. — an interview with a member of the research team, Lawrence Heaney, of the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago. Adult female Batomys uragon from Mt. Isarog, 1550 m elevation, Camarines Sur Province, Luzon Island. Photographed by E. A. Rickart, 18 March 1988.  

New bat species rises from vaults of London’s Natural H…

New bat species rises from vaults of London’s Natural H…

Mammals, New Species, Species Discovery November 1, 2015 at 12:00 am

Main Report: The Guardian | Category: | Taxa: | Named for: Other reports: