News in Nature

Citizen Science Reveals Annual Bird Migrations Across Continents

Citizen Science Reveals Annual Bird Migrations Across Continents

Citizen Science, News in Nature January 21, 2016 at 9:55 am

Data-driven animation shows routes for 118 species For the first time, scientists at the Cornell Lab of Ornithologyhave documented migratory movements of bird populations spanning the entire year for 118 species throughout the Western Hemisphere. The study finds broad similarity in the routes used by specific groups of species — vividly demonstrated by animated maps showing patterns of movement across the annual cycle.  

Scientists ID new genus of tree frogs long thought extinct

Scientists ID new genus of tree frogs long thought extinct

Amphibians, Nature Thriving, New Species, Species Discovery January 20, 2016 at 12:00 am

For more than a century, two mysterious tree frog specimens collected by a British naturalist in 1870 and housed at the Natural History Museum in London were assumed to be part of a vanished species, never again found in the wild.  Now, a group of scientists, led by renowned Indian biologist Sathyabhama Das Biju, has rediscovered the frogs and also identified them as part of a new genus – one step higher than a species on the taxonomic ranking.  Not only have they found the frogs in abundance in northeast Indian jungles, they believe they could also be living acrossRead More

Wyoming law against data collection: Protecting ranchers by ignoring the environment.

Wyoming law against data collection: Protecting ranchers by ignoring the environment.

Citizen Science, News in Nature January 14, 2016 at 1:49 am

Source: Wyoming law against data collection: Protecting ranchers by ignoring the environment.

This dog can write his own name.

News in Nature, Science News January 12, 2016 at 11:09 am

This is Jumpy, a super smart dog that knows how to sign his own name.  by trainer Omar von Muller      

Gorilla

Gorilla

Science News August 18, 2015 at 9:23 pm
New carnivorous plant species found on Facebook

New carnivorous plant species found on Facebook

Citizen Science, New Species, Plants, Species Discovery July 29, 2015 at 12:00 am

There’s more to Facebook than just posting selfies – it’s also an important forum for scientific discoveries. The second largest carnivorous plant in the Americas has just become the first plant to be discovered through the social media site. The species were discovered by an orchid grower, Reginaldo Vasconcelos, who posted an image on Facebook in 2012. A year later Paulo Gonella, a plant researcher at the Institute of Biosciences at the University of São Paulo came across the image and realised that it was a new species, a species of sundew.

Amateur Observations Help Predict Vast Bird Migrations 

Amateur Observations Help Predict Vast Bird Migrations 

With puzzling variability, vast numbers of Pine siskins from Canada’s boreal forests migrate hundreds or thousands of miles south from their usual winter range,  suddenly appearing thousands of kilometers away from their normal habitat for a season, before disappearing again for several years These so-called irruptions were first noticed by birdwatchers decades ago, but the driving factors have never been fully explained. ow, a collaboration between zoologists, climatologists and amateur observers has explained the phenomenon, and possibly given us the tools to predict where they will turn up in the future. The findings could prove important to our understanding of the effectsRead More

Citizen Scientists Discover Thirty New Species in their Own Back Yards

Citizen Scientists Discover Thirty New Species in their Own Back Yards

Citizen Science, Insects, New Species May 17, 2015 at 8:38 am

A recent study has revealed thirty species that are new to science living in the bustling city of Los Angeles.  The Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County initiated a project called BioSCAN to search for biodiversity, engaging citizen scientists to search for species in their own backyards.  Each species of the new species discovered has been named in honor of the volunteers who hosted the BioSCAN collections in their yards.  The flies are all members of the phorid family, and were captured in 30 insect traps set up in the backyards of homeowners around the city. Phorid flies are a little smaller than the fruitRead More

Citizen Scientists Find New Reptile Species in Southern California

Citizen Scientists Find New Reptile Species in Southern California

Citizen Science, News in Nature March 10, 2015 at 4:05 pm

These are examples of a sort of scientific collaboration that have become increasingly common. Scientists work with each other all the time, but more and more they find themselves turning to the public for help. An Indo-Pacific gecko in Glen Yoshida’s Torrance yard | Photo: © Jason Goldman

The discovery of 27 vertebrates fully reveals the unmatched biodiversity in Tanzania

The discovery of 27 vertebrates fully reveals the unmatched biodiversity in Tanzania

Biodiversity, New Species, Species Discovery October 26, 2014 at 12:00 am

Main Report: Phys.org | Journal: Diversity and Distributions Category: Amphibians, Reptiles, General | Taxa: | Named for: Other reports: A study by an international team of scientists coordinatedby Italy’s MUSE – Science Museum updates knowledge on the faunal richness of the Eastern Arc Mountains of Tanzania and Kenya; presents the discovery of 27 new vertebrate species (of which 23 amphibians and reptiles); identifies the drivers of the area’s exception biological importance and advocates for its candidature to the UNESCO’s List of World Heritage Sites.

New ‘deadbeat’ ant evolved by mooching off its relatives

New ‘deadbeat’ ant evolved by mooching off its relatives

Evolution, Insects, New Species August 21, 2014 at 1:16 pm

A newly-discovered species of ant supports a controversial theory of species formation.  The ant, known to live only under a single eucalyptus tree on the São Paulo State University campus in Brazil, branched off from its original species while living in the same colony, something thought rare in current models of evolutionary development.